Maps of Inca Empire

The Inca kept clay models of their land; however, none of those exist today. The best methods we have to create maps of the Inca empire is to rely on written records and early maps. Because of this research in the Andes is difficult. I have found many maps going back to European Discovery and have recreated others.

The Changing Locations of Cities

It’s easy to read the chronicles, but they refer to locations that do not exist anymore. Many cities and location names were changed throughout time. Other changed locations. Most ceased to exist altogether. This includes several important sites such as the battle of Pumapongo, the first battle of the War of the Brothers. We can speculate the valley it was fought in, but we do not know where exactly. With the early texts, these ancient maps and a little speculation we can create new maps of the Inca Empire.

The Maps

As an author, I spent months trying to re-create maps of the places mentioned in histories. I will publish it when it is ready. Through diligent searching, I’ve also found many maps and I will share them here. Many of these maps come from the Library of Congress. Others I’ve created. I also recommend this excellent map created by Andy Roscoe. He has a fascinating website that compliments mine.

I will continually add more maps.

 

http://www.cordandtassel.com/1569-map-of-peru/

http://www.cordandtassel.com/map-1692-south-america/

http://www.cordandtassel.com/quito-1772/

http://www.cordandtassel.com/maps-of-qhapaq-nan-inca-highway/

 

Andy Roscoe Map

Maps: Pedro de Cieza de Leon-Tahuantinsuyu

http://www.cordandtassel.com/map-cieza-de-leon/